Evolution ...

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Evolution ...

Post by LloydK on Sun Aug 24, 2014 11:57 am

I just sent Miles this email message.

Miles, your Evolution paper (http://mileswmathis.com/evol.pdf) seems like an excellent theory to me. It surprised me a little that you managed not to mention biophotons at all. When I first read about those a couple years or so ago on the TB forum, I remember the initial article said biophotons are what allow hundreds of thousands of chemical reactions to occur per second, I think in each cell. I suppose the biophoton scientists would be resistant to your charge field theory nonetheless, unfortunately, but maybe some of them not that much.

It seems like you've never read Sheldrake's book from about 1975, A New Science of Life. He discussed his theory of morphogenic fields, which Wal Thornhill liked, I guess because he may consider them to be related closely to electromagnetic fields. Dave Talbott invited Sheldrake to an early conference that Talbott put on in the 90s I guess. Sheldrake pointed out in the book some of the major problems in biology, which led him to his theory. Some were along the lines that your paper discusses. One was the problem of how untrained mice used in experiments with mazes by different scientists in different parts of the world were able over time to navigate the same mazes much more quickly on their maiden maze journeys. I guess another example he mentioned was that there was a similar experience among scientists growing crystals, whereby earlier growings of the same crystals took longer than later growings by different scientists. There were other examples Sheldrake mentioned more closely related to the discussion in your paper, but I don't recall the specifics now. But I think your theory is very promising for explaining the anomalies that Sheldrake discussed.

It's very interesting that you find reason to think that life can evolve in a single generation when environmental conditions change substantially. That's in agreement with some catastrophists' views on evolution. It's also interesting that life may be much more flexible than normally thought. A very simple thing I'd like to explore with your theory is mood. I'd like to find how the charge field can be altered to improve mood, reduce pain, enhance healing etc. I think Sheldrake said he got his theory of morphogenesis largely via meditation and my guess is that meditation can affect and "improve" the charge field. So I'm guessing that your theory can help people find ways to improve meditation and other approaches to make them much quicker and more effective. Whenever I tried meditation myself, I got poor results, mainly just sleepy or bored, though sometimes I got possible inspiration.

Yesterday in this TB forum post by C. Smith, http://www.thunderbolts.info/forum/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?f=10&t=15231&p=98892#p98892, he quotes New Scientist, saying: "Water bears, also known as tardigrades, are known for their virtual indestructibility on Earth. The creatures can survive intense pressures, huge doses of radiation, and years of being dried out." That may be a slight challenge for your theory. How can life forms resist changes in the charge field?

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Re: Evolution ...

Post by Cr6 on Tue Nov 11, 2014 1:33 am

Just a quick note on this.  Apparently the human nose is said to recognize over 1 Trillion smells.

http://news.sciencemag.org/biology/2014/03/human-nose-can-detect-trillion-smells

Perhaps only the charge field shaping the molecules can make this happen? The brain would pick up the "biophotons" via the nose almost instantly to recognize each unique smell. Perhaps the human brain is a unique biophoton receiver of sorts?

Personally, I think something like DMT/Magic Mushrooms/LSD/etc. may allow a more open reception of the charge field. Magic Mushrooms apparently can cause people to "hear" smells.  Perhaps a new biophoton channel is opened in the brain?  

I know that conciousness can be lost or gained very quickly by just Blood glucose levels alone. At a low 50 mg/Dl of glucose in the bloodstream during hypoglycemia, the brain will flip between "reality" and non-"reality" very quickly. DMT apparently can really cause a lot of reception of something very deep.  

Apparently, (...or my best guess) biophotons and glucose burning for energy are linked in the brain at some level.

http://bigthink.com/ideafeed/this-is-your-brain-on-magic-mushrooms  



For the duration of the psilocybin “trip” participants were potentially able to hear colors, taste sounds, or see smells. However, there are people who hear music in colors or see each letter of the alphabet as a particular color, but aren't on shrooms. This manner of thought is the way some people are wired—certain sensory regions bleeding into one another in a way that they are one.

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Re: Evolution ...

Post by Cr6 on Tue Nov 18, 2014 11:02 pm

Found this of interest:
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'Forgotten' Brain Region Rediscovered a Century Later
by Laura Geggel, Staff Writer   |   November 17, 2014 05:24pm ET


In 2012, researchers made note of a pathway in a region of the brain associated with reading, but "we couldn't find it in any atlas," said Jason Yeatman, a research scientist at the University of Washington's Institute for Learning and Brain Sciences. "We'd thought we had discovered a new pathway that no one else had noticed before."

A quick investigation showed that the pathway, known as the vertical occipital fasciculus (VOF), was not actually unknown. Famed neuroscientist Carl Wernicke discovered the pathway in 1881, during the dissection of a monkey brain that was most likely a macaque.

...
Pathway reintroduction

To remedy the confusion, Yeatman and his colleagues wrote an algorithm to help researchers find and identify the VOF. They used an MRI technique called diffusion-weighted imaging, which measures the size and direction of the brain's different pathways.

After imaging the brains of 37 people, the researchers found that the VOF starts in the occipital lobe, a part of the brain that processes visual information. It then spreads out like a sheet, connecting different brain regions: those that help people perceive visual categories, such as words and faces, and those involved with eye movements, attention and motion perception, the researchers said. The pathway could therefore help explain how the brain connects the two types of visual perception, Schmahmann said.

"There has to be some way for that dichotomy to merge," he said, "and the Wernicke fascicle is one way for the 'where' and the 'what' streams in the visual modality to become a unified whole."

Interestingly, two case studies from the 1970s found that people with damage to the VOF lost their ability to read because they could no longer recognize words. Moreover, the VOF has different myelination, a coating on nerve cells that helps information move faster.

"We don't know what it means yet, but [the myelination differences are] very consistent across every subject," Yeatman said. "It opens up some new hypotheses, new directions to study: Why is this structure so different than the other neighboring pathways?"

The study, published today (Nov. 17) in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, may encourage researchers to include the VOF in future brain atlases, Yeatman said.

http://www.livescience.com/48784-brain-pathway-rediscovered.html

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Re: Evolution ...

Post by Cr6 on Tue Nov 18, 2014 11:05 pm

Do the "Nodes of Ranvier" pick up the Charge Field or a manifestation of it?
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How nerve cells become myelinated.

Glial cells (called oligodendrocytes in the central nervous system and Schwann cells in the peripheral nervous system) produce an insulating material called myelin which wraps around nerve axons. Because of myelin, electrical signals can move along nerve axons at high speed. Myelination of axons starts late in embryonic development and continues through post-natal life. It requires as yet poorly understood communication between axons and glial cells. The molecules and mechanisms involved are being investigated with the hope of contributing to therapies for neural disorders that are caused by mistakes in myelination.

Insulating nerve axons with myelin is a complicated business. Early in life, Schwann cells meet up with bundles of axons growing out from the spinal cord towards the muscles and organs of the body. The clever Schwann cell is able to pick out an individual axon that requires myelination and pair with it. How does this happen? The Schwann cell is told by the axon to stretch out alongside the axon and to start making myelin. At the same time, the contact with the axon stimulates the Schwann cell to make daughter cells which can interact with new regions of the growing axon. While producing myelin the Schwann cell winds a sheath-like protrusion around the axon yielding multiple layers. Finally these layers are compacted resulting in a tightly packed insulating coat around the axon. (figure 4) Bigger axons have thicker myelin sheaths. The axon regulates the thickness of the sheath but the process is still poorly understood.

Oligodendrocytes in the central nervous system (brain and spinal cord) do a similar job to the Schwann cells. In contrast, however, they are able to myelinate several axons at once. The reason for this difference is not clear.

http://www.ngidd.eu/public/myelinated.html

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Each glial cell sends out a sheath-like process that wraps around an axon many times to produce a multilayered myelin sheath. (figure 3) This sheath is like insulating tape surrounding an electric wire.

Unlike the tape, however, the myelin sheath is discontinuous. Along the length of the axon there are gaps up to a millimetre apart where the axon is not covered by myelin. The gaps are called ‘Nodes of Ranvier’. This is where electrical signals originate. The signal jumps from one node to the next allowing it to move 100 times faster than in non-myelinated axons. So this was evolution’s clever answer to the need for rapid communication between brain and muscles resulting in a greater chance of survival for animals living in a dangerous world.

It is no surprise that errors in making myelin or wrapping it around the axon result in a number of neurological diseases. A well known example is multiple sclerosis (MS). Scientists are trying to understand the precise molecular interactions between the myelin producing glial cells and the axon. Hopefully, a proper understanding of these processes will lead to therapeutic answers to myelin-associated disorders.



Figure 3.
The process of myelination: a) A Schwann cell nestles itself around an axon. b) While continuously producing myelin, the Schwann cell winds a sheath-like protrusion around the axon yielding multiple layers. c) Finally, these layers are compacted into a tightly packed insulation coat. In the electron micrographic pictures, the myelin coat appears as a thick black line around the axon. A closer look shows the finer structure of the multilayered coat.

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Molecular organization

The molecular organization of the nodes is specialized for their function in impulse propagation. The level of sodium channels in the node versus the internode suggests that the number IMPs corresponds to sodium channels. Potassium channels are essentially absent in the nodal axolemma, whereas they are highly concentrated in the paranodal axolemma and Schwann cell membranes at the node.[4] The exact function of potassium channels have not quite been revealed, but it is known that they may contribute to the rapid repolarization of the action potentials or play a vital role in buffering the potassium ions at the nodes. This highly asymmetric distribution of voltage-gated sodium and potassium channels is in striking contrast to their diffuse distribution in unmyelinated fibers.[4][6]

The filamentous network subjacent to the nodal membrane contains cytoskeletal proteins called spectrin and ankyrin. The high density of ankyrin at the nodes may be functionally significant because several of the proteins that are populated at the nodes share the ability to bind to ankyrin with extremely high affinity. All of these proteins, including ankyrin, are enriched in the initial segment of axons which suggests a functional relationship. Now the relationship of these molecular components to the clustering of sodium channels at the nodes is still not known. Although some cell-adhesion molecules have been reported to be present at the nodes inconsistently; however, a variety of other molecules are known to be highly populated at the glial membranes of the paranodal regions where they contribute to its organization and structural integrity.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Node_of_Ranvier
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ankyrin

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Re: Evolution ...

Post by Cr6 on Tue Nov 18, 2014 11:56 pm

Noticed that potassium has a single alpha at Atomic Number 19. 1 single alpha + 9(2) alphas in the cube.

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Re: Evolution ...

Post by LloydK on Wed Nov 19, 2014 8:35 pm

Nerve Insulation Gaps
Unlike the tape, however, the myelin sheath is discontinuous. Along the length of the axon there are gaps up to a millimetre apart where the axon is not covered by myelin. The gaps are called ‘Nodes of Ranvier’. This is where electrical signals originate. The signal jumps from one node to the next allowing it to move 100 times faster than in non-myelinated axons.
Does anyone understand how the uninsulated parts of the nerves, called gaps, cause a much faster transmission of signals, than do normal nerves? Or how signals originate from these gaps? I suppose this is related to our discussion of "How a Battery Circuit Works". Right?

Biophoton Auras
Someone posted these video links on the TB forum lately:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zzSvEb5VV58
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3tvjeetPfes
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B1b9C1s-xXg

Here's the Russian scientist's article, SCIENTIFIC BASIS OF GDV BIOELECTROGRAPHY:
http://www.korotkov.eu/scientific-basis-of-gdv-bioelectrography/

Here's an excerpt. Therefore, it has been categorically proven that all biological objects emit photons, and these photons participate in the processes of physiological regulation, and most importantly in the oxidising (oxidizing in USA) restorative chain reactions. In other words, all biological objects, including humans, are glowing both day and night!

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Re: Evolution ...

Post by Cr6 on Sat Nov 29, 2014 9:40 pm

This theory would require the charge field IMHO if it amounts anything.

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Panspermia

Panspermia (from Greek πᾶν (pan), meaning "all", and σπέρμα (sperma), meaning "seed") is the hypothesis that life exists throughout the Universe, distributed by meteoroids, asteroids, comets,[1][2] planetoids,[3] and also by spacecraft, in the form of unintended contamination by microbes.[4][5]

Panspermia is a hypothesis proposing that microscopic life forms that can survive the effects of space, such as extremophiles, become trapped in debris that is ejected into space after collisions between planets and small Solar System bodies that harbor life. Some organisms may travel dormant for an extended amount of time before colliding randomly with other planets or intermingling with protoplanetary disks. If met with ideal conditions on a new planet's surfaces, the organisms become active and the process of evolution begins. Panspermia is not meant to address how life began, just the method that may cause its distribution in the Universe.[6][7][8]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Panspermia

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