Photon Sinewave Travel

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Re: Photon Sinewave Travel

Post by Nevyn on Tue Apr 03, 2018 12:15 am

I recognize that path! I've seen it in SpinSim plenty of times. Well, close enough, anyway.

I believe, but can't prove, that the linear velocity should be in the same direction that the top spin level's rotation axis is pointing, as you have mentioned above. To be clear, that means that a top level Z spin will have a linear velocity that moves in the Z dimension (where-as the actual spin causes motion in the XY plane).

With respect to speed, you don't need it to be moving fast. It can move at any speed you want it to. You just need to match the spin speed with the linear speed. That is, you take the axial rotation and set some speed on it. Whatever value you specify must also be applied to the linear speed such that the linear velocity causes a change in position equal to 8 times the radius in the exact same amount of time that the axial spin completes 1 revolution. I think that is it, I'm working from memory here and it has been some time since I looked into this stuff. I think I have mentioned it on this forum at some point so you might want to go over any posts where we have discussed this before.

How did I come up with the value 8? Easy, it is the circumference of the BPhoton when its radius is 1. We need to match that circumference to the linear distance traveled in the same amount of time. Since 1 revolution equals 1 circumference, then the linear velocity must change the position by the same amount in the same time.

How do I know to match these speeds? Easy, because every spin level has a tangential velocity of c and the linear velocity is c as well.

Please note that I am using the center of all spins as the center point of the particle and this is how you measure the linear velocity distance. You can't take the position of the BPhoton itself as that is moving because of all of the stacked spins. If you only have a BPhoton, or even if it has an axial spin, then the center of that is the center of the particle that that BPhoton is creating. Once you start adding spins above the axial, then the BPhoton rarely, if ever, coincides with that point.

Maybe an example will help because I'm not sure if I am explaining this well enough.

Imagine we create a BPhoton and place it in a scene so that the BPhotons center is at (0, 0, 0). The center of the particle that this BPhoton creates is also (0, 0, 0). If we give the BPhoton an axial spin then the center has not moved for either of them. However, if we add an X spin, then the BPhoton is moved over by 1 radii and rotates around (0, 0, 0). Now the BPhotons center is moving with respect to the particle it is creating and it never ever goes through (0, 0, 0) again. The particle, now a photon, can consider its own center as still being at (0, 0, 0) because the average position of the BPhotons center is actually (0, 0, 0).

I am abusing the term particle here but only because the mainstream destroyed it decades ago. If we call an electron a particle then what does that term actually mean, given stacked spins? I need a way to differentiate between a BPhoton and what that BPhoton creates when it has various spins stacked onto it and I am using the term particle to do that. Sorry for any confusion, you can abuse me if it pleases you. Smile
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Re: Photon Sinewave Travel

Post by Jared Magneson on Tue Apr 03, 2018 1:43 pm

That all makes very clean sense, Nevyn. Thanks for chiming in. Sometimes I get a little lost in the details and try to absorb too much at once, but your clarifications always help.

So in my demo vid, the A1 spin takes 30 frames (1 second playback time). Its radius is .5 (cm).

Nevyn wrote:Whatever value you specify must also be applied to the linear speed such that the linear velocity causes a change in position equal to 8 times the radius in the exact same amount of time that the axial spin completes 1 revolution.

Am I correct then that our Z1-level photon moving along Z should be moving 4cm/s, to keep relativity to A1 spinning at pseudo-c?

It looks like this now, and has a more definite "path":


And from the end, looking back towards the beginning:


All the timings here for the stacked spins are based on that 30-frame A1 rotation, as we've gone over before, so the X1, Y1, and Z1 should be moving properly relative to A1.

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Re: Photon Sinewave Travel

Post by Nevyn on Tue Apr 03, 2018 6:14 pm

Yes, that is correct.

Note that it doesn't matter how many stacked spins the particle has, that speed relationship stays the same. Only the axial spin and the linear velocity need to match and all spins stacked on top are relative to the axial spin as well. Everything is relative to that axial spin.
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Re: Photon Sinewave Travel

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