Transmutation

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Transmutation

Post by LloydK on Fri Nov 28, 2014 5:06 pm

CO & N2
Louis Kervran found that N2 in the air transmutes, when heated to a few hundred degrees F, into CO (carbon monoxide) in the body. I'd like to see if MM's models of these elements would allow that.

Does anyone know what his model of nitrogen is?


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Re: Transmutation

Post by Nevyn on Fri Nov 28, 2014 5:47 pm

This is Nitrogen:


Note that this model has ALL protons and is not like the diagrams Miles has made. Miles would draw this as 1 black in the top, 2 blue in the core and 1 blue in the bottom.
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Re: Transmutation

Post by Nevyn on Fri Nov 28, 2014 6:00 pm

CO:


N2:
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Re: Transmutation

Post by LloydK on Fri Nov 28, 2014 6:24 pm

Looks like Nevyn has time to play around. Eh? I had edited my OP and posted a model of N2 to CO based on MM's models, but somehow it got deleted.

You have two different models of N2 there, don't you? I deleted my copies of MM's models for C and O. Can you post a model of CO below one of N2?

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Re: Transmutation

Post by Nevyn on Sat Nov 29, 2014 9:53 am

The top model is Carbon Monoxide, CO and the bottom one is diatomic Nitrogen, N2.

Both Carbon and Nitrogen have 2 alphas in their core which are red in my models. Oxygen has 3 alphas in its core which are colored cyan.

Carbon and Oxygen have a single proton in both ends while Nitrogen has a single proton in one end and an alpha in the other.
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Re: Transmutation

Post by LloydK on Sat Nov 29, 2014 3:43 pm

MM showed CO2 in the Methane paper at milesmathis.com/meth.pdf

- means horizontal proton
= means double horizontal protons
E means triple horizontal protons
| means vertical proton

(C) -||||-  (O) -||||||- (from another paper)

(Would this =||||= also be possible for Oxygen? I ask because that structure comes up at the end of this.)

(CO2)
-||||||--||||--||||||- (individual atoms side-by-side)

-||||||=||||=||||||- (atoms joined in CO2)

-||||||E||E||||||- (C protons rearranged by strong O charge field on Earth)

(N2)
-||||=-||||=
Wouldn't N2 have triple protons in the center like this?
-||||E||||=

(CO)
-||||-=||||=
Could not the N2 triple protons get divided as shown to make C and O as a molecule?

Addendum (unfinished):

(C) -|:|:|:|-
(N) -|:|:|:|.=
(O) =|:|:|:|:=

-|:|:|:|.= -|:|:|:|.=

-|:|:|:|-=.|:|:|:|.=


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Re: Transmutation

Post by Cr6 on Sat Nov 29, 2014 4:58 pm

Nevyn wrote:The top model is Carbon Monoxide, CO and the bottom one is diatomic Nitrogen, N2.

Both Carbon and Nitrogen have 2 alphas in their core which are red in my models. Oxygen has 3 alphas in its core which are colored cyan.

Carbon and Oxygen have a single proton in both ends while Nitrogen has a single proton in one end and an alpha in the other.

I can see that. Nitrogen is a trouble maker for diagramming. I'm not surprised Mathis doesn't give it a lot of coverage of it in his models. It requires much more consideration of how it bonds with the single alpha. I can see your use of the 2-alphas could complement the models. Would it hold together?

Salt is not what we thought and neither is molecular bonding  Lately I've been going back to this paper for some reason on transmutation.

=====
139.  The Unified Field explains the Atmosphere including the non-layering of O and N

Otherwise we can't hope to get a final answer here. When we pursue this question with more detail in later papers, we will find that it depends upon the neutrons' position in the nucleus, but with nitrogen and oxygen, we find them only in two positions: either they are in standard positions in alphas (as below), or they are paired with an outermost proton, pulling charge into the axial holes. In the alphas, they are positioned with their equators parallel to the proton equators. This allows their charge field emission—which is polar —to act to keep the protons apart and from interfering with one another. But since the neutron poles are now aligned to the axial charge movement, they can also channel charge along parallel corridors. In other words, in this position they divert part of the charge that the protons would otherwise have channeled equatorially. Since smaller nuclei like nitrogen and oxygen don't have carousel levels, no bonding is taking place along those equatorial channels, and the neutrons are completely free to divert a part of the charge in those channels back to the axial channel.


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Re: Transmutation

Post by Nevyn on Sat Nov 29, 2014 7:31 pm

LloydK wrote:(C) -||||-  (O) -||||||- (from another paper)
(O) =||||= (Would this also be possible for Oxygen?)

Oxygen could have that structure using an alpha-4 core but that wouldn't give it enough power to do the things it does. Oxygen needs the alpha-6 core to provide pulling power which makes it a very reactive element.

LloydK wrote:
(CO2)
-||||||--||||--||||||- (individual atoms side-by-side)

-||||||=||||=||||||- (atoms joined in CO2)

-||||||E||E||||||- (C protons rearranged by strong O charge field on Earth)

Yes, the strong charge field of Oxygen can rearrange smaller elements such as Carbon in this way. However, I am not convinced this can occur with CO since it only has the 1 Oxygen atom. CO2 has 2 of them working on the Carbon atom from both sides which can rearrange it. CO does not have that much power.

LloydK wrote:
(N2)
-||||=-||||=
Wouldn't N2 have triple protons in the center like this?
-||||E||||=

It is possible for N2 to have a triple bond like that but only with extreme pressure which can lead to N3 and N4. Natural diatomic Nitrogen is known to be quite unreactive which leads me to put the 2 single protons together in the bond.

LloydK wrote:
(CO)
-||||-=||||=
Could not the N2 triple protons get divided as shown to make C and O as a molecule?

I don't think this is possible in normal conditions. Extreme conditions can always bring about extreme results but even then I don't think it would result in quite that model. Nuclear bonds are extremely tight and very hard to break. Atomic bonds a strong but are breakable with a bit of effort. Molecular bonds are weak.

I don't see how N2 can be changed into CO without some catalyst providing the Oxygen atoms and even then it is difficult to change Nitrogen into a Carbon atom as the alpha-2 in Nitrogen is tightly bonded in there and doesn't want to come out for just anybody. The way I see it, that alpha-2 in the end of N is the main reason N is used in so many compounds. In all of the models I have tried to build with N I have found that N tends to plug up ends of other elements that would otherwise be a hook proton. This seems to plug up the charge which means the molecule stores more energy. Fluorine does a similar thing but it is much more reactive because it has an alpha-6 core, like O.

In order to convert N2 into CO, I believe an extremely strong charge catalyst is required that can firstly blow apart the N2 molecule. That alone requires great strength so it would need to be a large element or molecule. This might break N2 apart into separate pieces like this: -||||E||||=  -->  -||||- and =||||=. The first part is Carbon but the second part has some problems. Firstly, it only has an alpha-4 in its core which does not provide much power. Secondly, both of those ends are an alpha-2 which don't want to break apart without a very good reason. I don't think this very likely because it requires the alpha-2 of 1 N atom to break out and swap places with the single proton of the other.

The neutrons in an alpha provide structure and make it difficult to break the 2 protons apart because whatever action you do to one of them, you also do to the other indirectly because the alpha structure transfers part of the applied force to both protons which keeps the 2 protons aligned. It is possible but I believe the best way to break them is to overwhelm them from the inside out. That is, a molecule or external field provides a greater through-charge than the alpha can handle and it falls apart or realigns to handle the charge more effectively. That is the way I have interpreted Miles usage of element rearrangements such as Neodymium where a strong external charge field needs to be applied in order to rearrange the structures.

I think we need to know more about this conversion. What is the environment it occurs in? What other elements and molecules are around to help? What are the by-products?
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Re: Transmutation

Post by LloydK on Sat Nov 29, 2014 8:58 pm

Scientific Method
Observations are primary. Theory is secondary. I think the evidence for transmutation of this kind is extremely strong and there are numerous other transmutations that also have very good evidence. So the issue is likely to find the right structure for each element to satisfy the needs of transmutation.

Transmutation Conditions for N2 to CO
The conditions in which N2 converts into CO are:
high heat applied to the N2 in the air, such as when welding;
inhalation of the N2 by animals or mammals, such as human welders;
conversion of the N2 to CO in the blood, which binds to hemoglobin, replacing oxygen.

Sulfur from Oxygen
On Europa and maybe Io it appears likely that oxygen in H2O converted to sulfur, coloring the ice red, brown etc. EU theory says it was by electric discharging on the surface, maybe like on a plasma globe.

TB Forum Transmutation Thread
I compiled a lot of transmutation info on this TB forum thread:
http://www.thunderbolts.info/forum/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=209

Carbon to Iron
Here's one of my old posts there:
http://www.thunderbolts.info/forum/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=209&start=30#p2303
EXPERIMENT TO TRANSMUTE CARBON INTO IRON
http://www.google.com/books?id=bxu-n2j-E_8C&pg=PA25&dq=biological+transmutations&sig=nda825zmviyIS73mAQZdwMIDGno#PPA25,M1
- Ohsawa (1971) wrote a book condensation of Kervran's publication and added some experiments he had carried out himself. He had "transformed" carbon into iron using a low-cost apparatus assembled from some pieces of wire, a copper plate and a variable 110-230V transformer.
- I don't know what the pathway is supposed to be for transmuting carbon into iron, but the most plausible seems to be C.6:12 + O.8:16 = Si.14:28; 2Si = Ni.28:56; Ni.28:56 - H.1:1 - H.1:1 = Fe.26:54. The second most plausible route seems to be C + O = Si; Si + 4Li = Fe.26:56.
- If anyone can find the book by Ohsawa, it may explain how to do the experiment in more detail.


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Re: Transmutation

Post by Cr6 on Sat Nov 29, 2014 9:27 pm

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diamond_anvil_cell
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Windhexe

These tools are interesting for transmutation.

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