Superconductivity

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Superconductivity

Post by Cr6 on Fri Dec 05, 2014 12:02 am

Was reading part of the Solid Light Paper today.

http://milesmathis.com/solidlight.pdf

NEW PAPER, added 9/19/14, Solid Light? No, just another bad interpretation of the Charge Field. I analyze the recent paper from Princeton, claiming solid light, stopped light, or blended light. In doing so, I am able to explain high-temperature superconduction mechanically, including showing the physical cause of the Meissner Effect. My analysis includes a full nuclear diagram of a Copper-Oxide ceramic, showing how charge is channeled through the architecture. This destroys BCS and RVB theory, Cooper pairs, polaritons, dimer math, and the rest of the fudged pseudo-explanations of solid-state physics.

Came across this quote:
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In what follows, it will help if you have already read my paper on Period 4, where I diagram many of the transition metals, showing how the charge streams are created. That is where this diagram of Copper came from. In superconductivity, we will be following the polar or axial channel (from bottom to top) in the above diagram. This is what I call the through charge stream, because it concerns charge that passes straight through from south to north without being channeled out the carousel level. The carousel level is composed of the disks on the equator, which spin as a whole east/west in a circle (like a carousel). Normally, they pull charge from the poles to the equator, where the bulk of it is re-emitted. It is the spin of the nucleus which causes this main stream, with the greater angular momentum at the equator causing the greater charge emission there. In most cases and with most elements, the main or primary charge stream is from pole to equator.

But when we are looking at what we call electrical conduction, we are looking at the stream from south pole to north. This stream is linear, directionalized, and coherent. If we align the poles of adjacent nuclei, we create longer lines of conduction.
As you can probably see already, this explains the Meissner Effect in superconductivity, where interior magnetic lines disappear. We have never been given a simple mechanical explanation for that, but my diagram of Copper supplies it immediately. If this Copper nucleus begins superconducting, that simply means that all photons being recycled are going from pole to pole. None are being recycled out the equatorial or carousel level. As we know, the magnetic field lines are always orthogonal to the electrical field lines. Well, the electrical fields lines go with the conduction. They run south to north here. The magnetic field lines are then orthogonal to that and in a circle, by the old right hand rule. Well, since we have no photons being emitted out the equator in this case, we have no magnetic field being created. Both the electrical field and magnetic field are caused by the charge field, and the charge field is just the recycled photons. Photons that are recycled from south to north in a line create the electrical field, and photons that are recycled through the carousel level create the magnetic field. So if all charge is channeled south to north as through charge, nothing is left to create the magnetic field. It disappears. This disappearance is what we call the Meissner Effect.
This tells us how the magnetic field and electrical field are related at the foundational level. Given my theory, we should have expected the magnetic field to go to zero when the electrical field was at a maximum, since the field creation is a zero-sum game. Since the same charge field creates both, a maximal electrical conduction implies a zero magnetic field. If all charge photons are being conducted, none can be left to create the magnetic field (internally). Since all photons are spinning, the external electrical field will still have a potential magnetic component, but in the atoms themselves, there is nothing that we would call a magnetic field. Given superconduction, those internal field lines are gone.

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Re: Superconductivity

Post by Cr6 on Sat Dec 06, 2014 2:31 am

Was looking over this link on EDLC's:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electric_double-layer_capacitor

Mathis should have a much clearer explanation with his charge field?

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Electric double-layer capacitor

In a conventional capacitor, energy is stored by moving charge carriers, typically electrons, from one metal plate to another. This charge separation creates a potential between the two plates, which can be harnessed in an external circuit. The total energy stored in this fashion increases with both the amount of charge stored and the potential between the plates. The amount of charge stored per unit voltage is essentially a function of the size, the distance and the material properties of the plates and the material in between the plates (the dielectric), while the potential between the plates is limited by the breakdown field strength of the dielectric. The dielectric controls the capacitor's voltage. Optimizing the material leads to higher energy density for a given size.

EDLCs do not have a conventional dielectric.[citation needed] Instead of two plates separated by an intervening insulator, these capacitors use virtual plates made of two layers of the same substrate.[citation needed] Their electrochemical properties, the so-called "electrical double layer", result in the effective separation of charge despite the vanishingly thin (on the order of nanometers) physical separation of the layers. The lack of need for a bulky layer of dielectric and the porosity of the material used, permits the packing of plates with much larger surface area into a given volume, resulting in high capacitances in small packages.

In an electrical double layer, each layer is quite conductive, but the physics at the interface between them means that no significant current can flow between the layers.[citation needed] The double layer can withstand only a low voltage, which means that higher voltages are achieved by matched series-connected individual EDLCs, much like series-connected cells in higher-voltage batteries.

EDLCs have much higher power density than batteries.[citation needed] Power density combines the energy density with the speed at which the energy can be delivered to the load. Batteries, which are based on the movement of charge carriers in a liquid electrolyte, have [5] relatively slow charge and discharge times. Capacitors can be charged or discharged at a rate that is typically limited by the heat tolerance of the electrodes.

While existing EDLCs have energy densities that are perhaps 1/10 that of a conventional battery, their power density is generally 10 to 100 times as great.[citation needed] This makes them most suited to an intermediary role between electrochemical batteries and electrostatic capacitors, where neither sustained energy release nor immediate power demands dominate.

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Each EDLC cell consists of two electrodes, a separator and an electrolyte. The two electrodes are often electrically connected to their terminals via a metallic collector foil. The electrodes are usually made from activated carbon since this material is electrically conductive and has a very large surface area to increase the capacitance. The electrodes are separated by an ion permeable membrane (separator) used as an insulator to prevent short circuits between the electrodes. This composite is rolled or folded into a cylindrical or rectangular shape and can be stacked in an aluminium can or a rectangular housing. The cell is typically impregnated with a liquid or viscous electrolyte, either organic or aqueous, although some are solid state. The electrolyte depends on the application, the power requirement or peak current demand, the operating voltage and the allowable temperature range. The outer housing is hermetically sealed.

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Re: Superconductivity

Post by LloydK on Tue Jan 13, 2015 10:51 pm

Cryogenic Electrons Emitted in Bursts
http://milesmathis.the-talk.net/t81-cryogenic-electrtons-emitted-in-bursts

Brant posted the information on the TB forum and I copied it to the link above in the Non-MM section.

It says a photomultiplier was cooled down to 4 Kelvin and some kind of dark emission was detected and electrons were observed to be emitted in bursts.

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Re: Superconductivity

Post by Cr6 on Wed Apr 08, 2015 11:35 pm

Looks like there's a new paper on Superconductivity.  They are now using "massless" glue and "unparticles":
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Unparticles may provide a new path to superconductivity

Apr 07, 2015 by Lisa Zyga feature


In their paper, LeBlanc and Grushin show that, if unparticles were present in superconductors, then they would assist the normal electrons in pairing, acting as the glue that holds them together in Cooper pairs. As a result, the material can become superconducting.

The physicists explain that this unparticle-mediated superconductivity would be very different than conventional phonon-mediated superconductivity. It's also different than proposals in which a particle acts as the glue, since all of the particles in these proposals have mass.

"We have proposed a very weird glue, which does not have a mass," LeBlanc explained. "As a result, both the glue and the resulting binding strength (the strength of the superconductivity) are different. So we could get superconductivity with an 'unparticle glue' in cases where a 'particle glue' would never superconduct. To top things off, high-temperature superconductors might be one of those places. But this remains to be seen."

Although unparticles have never been experimentally observed, physicists plan to look for their signatures at future LHC experiments.
"Unparticles are hard to observe directly, due to having no density," LeBlanc said. "Therefore, one needs to look at the other particles nearby and see how they react to the presence of unparticles."

If unparticles do play a role in superconductivity, knowing this may help in their search.

"If one can find materials in the lab where these unparticle effects are strong, then this will motivate a lot of work in understanding the subtle interplay of unparticles with particle matter," LeBlanc said.
In the future, the physicists plan to further explore the connections between unparticles and superconductivity in all possible forms.

"So far, we've tackled how the superconducting glue could be of an unparticle nature," Grushin said. "Other researchers have addressed the situation where electrons, and not their glue, behave as unparticles. But what happens if both glue and electrons are of unparticle nature? Along the way, it is important to explore all of the things that unparticles could do, so that we know where to look and know when we find them. This is where we intend to go."

http://phys.org/news/2015-04-unparticles-path-superconductivity.html#ms

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